On Saturday 25th March we get to vote for the 58th Parliament of New South Wales. This includes all 93 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, including the Epping electorate. Plus 21 of the 42 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Council.

NSW Election 2023 Epping Candidates

As we approach 25th March, there’s a lot of media coverage about the election – but it can be hard to actually find out information about the local candidates and what they stand for. Chances are most of us won’t get along to a meet the candidates forum and won’t get to speak with the candidate directly. So to make it easier to get to know the candidates, we developed a set of 10 questions. And asked each candidate in the Epping electorate to answer them. Plus four other electorates – Auburn, Granville, Parramatta, Winston Hills.

| About Epping Electorate | Meet the Epping Candidates | Candidate AnswersAbout the State Election |

We sent our candidate survey to all candidates listed on the Electoral Commission website on Sunday 12th March, after candidate nominations closed and ballots drawn. We strongly believe it’s in everyone’s interest for all candidates to provide responses. And we welcome your support in encouraging them to do so.

We appreciate candidates making the time to respond, particularly given how busy it is for them in the lead up to the election. Candidate participation is purely voluntary. The responses have been provided by the candidates themselves and have only been formatted, not edited (even to correct spelling or grammatical errors). Where a candidate did not provide information, we have written NO RESPONSE RECEIVED.

ParraParents is not aligned with any political party or candidate. We have collected this information to help you make an informed decision when voting in the 2023 NSW state election.


About the Epping Electorate

Epping Electorate map NSW State Election 2023

The Epping electorate is 37 square kilometres and includes all or part of the following suburbs: Epping, North Epping, Beecroft, Carlingford, Dundas Valley, Telopea, Oatlands and North Rocks. Note: the Epping electorate boundary changed in 2021, shifting south-west.

Learn about the Epping electorates history, geography, political situation and results of the 2019 election by checking out the Tally Room’s election guide.


Meet the Candidates for Epping

Here are the 6 candidates running in the Epping electorate. Here they are, listed in alphabetical order by surname. Click on their name to go to their webpage.

Live Q&A with Alan Mascarenhas


Candidate Answers

We’ve provided candidate answers together for each question. Use the links below to jump to the different questions, or just keep scrolling through.

  1. Connection to Epping
  2. Interesting Facts About the Candidate
  3. Achievements
  4. Main Issues Affecting Epping
  5. Key Issue Affecting Families
  6. Population Growth, Development and Community Infrastructure
  7. Local Schools
  8. Changing Climate
  9. Planning System
  10. What They Plan to Achieve
  11. Other Comments

Note: Candidate answers have been provided in the order in which they were received. They are provided as received, with minor formatting and spelling corrections. In the case of Premier Dominic Perrottet, we didn’t receive a response to our survey, but he did respond to the Ryde District Mums survey and we’ve included his responses to similar questions here.


1What is your connection with your electorate (including how long you have lived in the area) and what you like about it?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • I have been a City of Parramatta Councillor since 2017, the first Greens Councillor ever here. Since then, I have worked nearly full-time as a Councillor, assisting residents across the whole Parramatta local government area (LGA), which covers most of the new Epping electorate.
  • I have also connected to the Epping electorate as the Greens candidate for Parramatta in four previous Federal elections and three State elections.
  • I have lived with my spouse Annie Nielsen in the LGA for 28 years and have two daughters. Before then, I lived 15 years near Eastwood Public School, with my daughters going there and one later to West Epping Public School.
  • I love Parramatta’s vibrancy, its remarkable Aboriginal, colonial, multicultural and built heritage, and its fabulous green spaces including its bushland, especially at Lake Parramatta and Hunt’s Creek Carlingford.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • The seat of Epping is an area where I have deep roots. My family migrated to Australia in 1987. Our first home was in Carlingford. After Dad passed away early, Mum raised me and my sisters in the West Pennant Hills Valley. We would shop at Carlingford Court and North Rocks (which back then was a Westfield). I’d catch the train to school from Beecroft. Every summer, I’d play tennis at the Epping YMCA. So I understand the area and am passionate about its future.
  • Epping is home to some of Sydney’s best schools. Aspirational families move in to give their kids a great education. There is a dynamic mix of residents – including people of different faiths and cultural backgrounds. Despite the bustle, I also love the peace and seclusion from big city living – from the village atmosphere of Beecroft and North Epping to local bushland, parks and reserves.

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • I live in the Epping electorate with my beautiful wife Helen and our children.
  • I was lucky to grow up locally – I went to school at Redfield College in Dural and Oakhill College in Castle Hill, before studying Commerce/Law at Sydney University.
  • There’s so much to love about Epping. We have areas of outstanding natural beauty, like Byles Creek just down the road from me in Beecroft, and some really significant heritage sites. Add in the excellent local businesses, cafes and shops we have all throughout the Epping electorate, that bring our area to life. The end result is a great place to live, work and raise a family.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

2What are 3 things people might not know about you?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  1. I have demonstrated my ability to not just talk, but to act on my beliefs as a Parramatta Councillor, and previously as a civil engineer, TAFE teacher, and senior officer of the NSW Teachers Federation.
  2. I have won a National Volunteer Award for voluntary leadership roles in the Parramatta Climate Action Network (10 years), the Parramatta Female Factory Action Group (5 years) and as President of Reconciliation for Western Sydney (20 years).
  3. I also volunteer with Parramatta Bushcare and on the Executive of the Better Planning Network, as well as for plastic and other litter cleanups.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  1. I’m a Catholic
  2. I’ve travelled extensively and lived abroad. This has given me empathy for people of all walks of life and appreciation of how lucky we are in Australia.
  3. My professional background as a journalist makes me somewhat of an independent thinker. We need more of that in politics!

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

3What have you already achieved for/ in the electorate?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • Firstly, I must say that the views expressed in all my responses are mine and not necessarily those of the City of Parramatta Council or of other Councillors.
    1. As the first Parramatta Greens Councillor, I successfully moved that Council lobby the State and Federal Planning & Heritage Ministers to grant National Heritage Listing for the Parramatta Female Factory Fleet Street Precinct, which was approved soon after.
    2. I have also achieved increased provision for high performing building sustainability, increased tree planting, reduced use of single use plastics, planning for three community gardens, strong opposition to a huge toxic Incinerator in Western Sydney, provisions for the electric vehicle transition and more climate related actions, including Council now purchasing 100% renewable electricity.
    3. I have also supported and moved numerous Council motions including some successful, to reduce excessive high-rise and other overdevelopment, and to protect heritage sites.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • I stood as Labor’s candidate for Epping in 2019. And I’m really proud that our grassroots campaign achieved real gains for the community. These included forcing the Liberal Government to upgrade Epping West Public School after years of inaction. There were 1300 kids crammed into 30 demountable classrooms. But with the help of some amazing local parents, we doorknocked homes, ran a community petition and argued our case in the media. And we won!
  • I also led a successful community effort to restore M2 bus routes to the city. These were cut by Dominic Perrottet from places like Cherrybrook, West Pennant Hills, Carlingford and North Rocks following the introduction of the North West Metro.
  • So I have the energy, skills and proven track record to be the fresh new advocate this community needs. Voters in Epping already know who their MP is. I want people to see that I’m a real and credible alternative for your support.

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • I’m proud of what we’ve achieved over the past four years in Epping, including delivering the Northwest Metro, with stations at Epping and Cherrybrook; Ngarala Public School, a brand-new school in the heart of Epping; the Beecroft Station upgrade; school upgrades at Epping Public and Carlingford Public; the NorthConnex tunnel, which has taken thousands of trucks off Pennant Hills Road; and removing demountables from Epping West Public School.
  • Our state faces challenging economic conditions ahead, with high inflation, rising interest rates and the threat of a global recession. If we don’t make the right decisions, families and businesses face an even more difficult and uncertain economic future.
  • Now more than ever, NSW needs a government with a real plan for our state – and the leadership, financial discipline, and experience to deliver it.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

4What do you see as the main issues affecting your electorate? (limit to 5)

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  1. Poorly planned overdevelopment without the community infrastructure, green spaces and services needed to maintain liveability standards for the population growth expected to double in 20 years.
  2. Cost of living pressures that would be addressed by Greens policies to:
    • provide much more genuinely affordable housing;
    • make public transport and education free;
    • reduce childcare costs;
    • provide more cheap clean renewable energy; andcreate more quality, secure, safe and better paid jobs, especially in the public sector for nurses, teachers, emergency services, child and aged care workers.
  3. Addressing increasing extreme heat and its negative heat stress health impacts, including by increasing tree canopy cover, and urgently completing the Parramatta Aquatic Centre and Epping Swimming Centre (with affordable cheap entry costs).
  4. Inadequate state public services funding including for transport, education, health and youth services, which should be funded by increasing the public value of obscene unearned windfall developer profits from rezoning for higher density development, introducing an empty dwelling levy for unused investment properties and increasing taxes for owners of properties of value more than $20 million and/or eight or more properties.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  1. Cost of living: including groceries, rent, petrol and tolls
  2. Traffic congestion: it’s completely unacceptable that it still takes 30 minutes or more to get from one side of Epping to the other. I’m sorry to say this is a problem owned by the Liberal Party’s neglect and mismanagement of the area over many decades. Perrottet has broken his promise from 2019 to widen Epping Bridge: four years later, nothing has been achieved.But the impact of congestion is being felt everywhere, along Pennant Hills Road, or the schools around Carlingford West, or back streets like Evans, Jenkins and New North Rocks Roads which are popular for rat runs. Of course, the crazy and escalating price of tolls only puts more pressure on suburban streets.
  3. School planning: some schools are overcrowded (particularly around Carlingford and Epping), while others are not. As primary school students quickly grow into high school students, we also need to be preparing for future needs.
  4. Lack of healthcare access: the seat is a public hospital black hole and it takes many residents too long to access care.
  5. Deteriorating buses and trains: Epping is a commuter seat so the outages to the rail network have really hurt. Bus privatisation and driver shortages have also hit routes like the 545, 546 and 550 (and the cost of public transport isn’t cheap either).

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • I know that pressure on household budgets is worrying for most people. With global inflation pushing up prices, my government is doing everything it can do to ease the pressure for working families.
  • Another key challenge is the increased growth in our area – we need to ensure that local infrastructure continues to be delivered to keep up with the pace of change.
  • Finally, housing affordability is an issue that gets raised with me everywhere I go. Our First Buyer Home Choice policy will make it easier for people to get the keys to their own home and get on the housing ladder.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

5What is one key issue affecting local families in your electorate and how do you plan to address it?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • The cost of living and paying ever increasing bills, with salary/wage increases lagging behind and the need for more youth services.
  • See 4.2 above “Cost of living pressures that would be addressed by Greens policies” and 4.4 above “Inadequate state public services funding”.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • I want to address traffic congestion in the Epping Town Centre. This is the critical issue coming up time and again. The current proposal to widen Epping Bridge needs a stern ruler run over it to ensure it will provide a real solution for generations to come. I would also seek immediate advice from traffic engineers on simple changes we can make quickly to improve the flow around Beecroft and Carlingford Roads, as well as Rawson Street. I don’t have a magic wand, but a new MP and a new government will bring some fresh thinking.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

6What are your thoughts on projected population growth for your electorate, associated development and community infrastructure?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • The population growth in our area is planned by governments excessively to double in 20 years in our area.
  • This overdevelopment has been inadequately planned for, as the resulting doubly increased community infrastructure, green spaces and services needs to maintain liveability standards are not being planned for completion before the development population increase. Nor has this scale of increase been planned for completion soon after the additional residents and workers have arrived.
  • The State government must support a much higher public value share of the huge profits that developers and land owners are making, especially in the CBD. Parramatta Council is in shortfall for the necessitated community infrastructure funding by about $1,200 Million for the full CBD NSW government approved development alone, yes $1.2 BILLION shortfall for the CBD alone as estimated by Council staff.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • The redrawn seat of Epping now includes Carlingford, North Rocks, Telopea, Oatlands and Dundas Valley. I call these the “forgotten suburbs” of Parramatta. They are experiencing Parramatta’s growing pains, but not receiving anything like the same attention and investment from government.
  • I even hear about how much reinvigoration has been put into Eastwood. But the key message I want to convey is that Epping and Carlingford could do with more love!
  • Epping and Carlingford have exploded – with 6000 new residents since the last Census and Carlingford another 4000. Their growth is more than double that of Parramatta and the effects are spilling into areas like North Rocks and Dundas Valley.
  • However, the Liberal Government is taking Epping and Carlingford for granted and failing to manage growth. Even the local library in Carlingford is exactly the same size as when I was a child growing up in the 1980s – and that’s just absurd.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

7Please share your thoughts on local schools in your electorate and what they need

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • I agree with growing concern among parents about the overcrowding of some schools – with play areas being lost and lunch times having to be rostered.
  • This is outrageous and a clear example of poor planning and inadequate funding for education and for preservation of open spaces, in favour of high rise overcrowding by government allowing huge profits to wealthy developers and land owners.
  • School teachers and support staff are overworked and underpaid. The Greens recognise this and will address much of the unnecessary administrative work teachers are required to do, increase staffing levels and lift public school workers’ salaries above the public sector pay cap, including by a minimum 15% pay increase for school and TAFE teachers.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • Every child deserves a great education. The seathas many schools with an outstanding reputation. But there is huge pressure on school catchments as more people move into areas like Epping and Carlingford. Out of area enrolments do need reform. Many local parents are also worried about sliding standards and student results.
  • We need to better support and reward teachers who did so much for the community during COVID. Many are just burnt out. Labor’s pledge to convert 10,000 casual teachers into permanent roles will reduce class sizes in Epping and improve the consistency of instruction.
  • Our free Literacy and Numeracy Tuition Program will be available to every public school student, regardless of means, and supplement existing coaching services which are so popular in the electorate.
  • Finally, our policy to co-locate preschools with public schools (including Catholic and other non-government schools) is the way of the future.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

8Western Sydney keeps getting hotter! It can be costly for families (and others) to keep cool and our changing climate impacts on health and wellbeing. What do you think is needed and what do you commit to

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • Yes, global warming is already a serious health threat with extreme heat related health costs exceeding the total cost of all other extreme weather health impacts.
  • It can be costly for families to travel to ocean beaches, the Parramatta River and other key waterways or the Epping Pool or yet to be completed ParramattaAquaticCentre. This goes to the heart of the problem and are potentially a great way for families to cool offbut sadly they continue to be in poor health and there is no water quality monitoring of a number of natural local swimming spots used by families.
  • I was a Councillor representative on the Parramatta River Catchment Management Group and have as a civil engineer worked to minimise waterway pollution and treat trade wastes. The PRCG is working hard to clean up sources of pollution, support wetland filtration and purification works like near completion at Milson Park Westmead and to make the Parramatta River swimmable again by 2025, like Lake Parramatta is now (most of the time). I support the reintroduction in schools and communities of Stream Watch pollution monitoring and more funding for the Environment Protection Authority to do this and to enforce compliance.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • Yes, families in Epping need relief from the heat. We are still feeling the loss of Parramatta Pool, taken away by the Liberal Government. And I’ll be on the Council’s case to ensure the Epping Pool upgrade is as good as can be.
  • It’s great that more local swimming spots are being opened up around Sydney Harbour. Now it’s important to give the same attention to communities around the Parramatta River.
  • Tree canopy is also vital. I see time and again how development in our suburbs has led to the removal of mature trees. Synthetic grass gardens are increasingly popular, yet they are themselves heat sinks. I’m particularly concerned that poor building standards mean many blocks have inadequate insulation.
  • In government, I’ll be an advocate for enforceable tree canopy and open space targets that are more than just a piece of paper. While development to some extent is inevitable, we also need rigorous rules and oversight of developers to ensure the interests of owners and renters are protected.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

9What are your thoughts on the current planning system, in particular complying development? And what, if any, improvements do you want to see?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • Some small scale code complying developments are not problematic, but many larger ones are totally unacceptable and often non-compliant due to inadequate private certifier approvals and/or supervision. “They who pay the piper call the tune” is relevant here as the property owner or builder choose the private certifier and pay to get the outcome they want.
  • The current planning system has been redesigned consistently by the NSW Coalition government to benefit land owners, developers and investors.
  • Recent changes such as the NSW government banning public value share of rezoning land value windfall increases, providing for secret rezoning proposals, reducing community input into the fast tracked rapid assessment framework and the government overruling the Parramatta CBD Local Environment Plan made by its own Department of Planning and Environment to allow even greater density of development, are all examples of the NSW Coalition government’s planning changes which The Greens opposed and will reverse as far as possible.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • Planning is tilted too far in favour of developers and away from local residents. In the seat of Epping, I see the pressures every day as new duplexes double the strain on essential services and utilities like electricity and water. Pennant Hills Road has always been a nightmare, yet even more development is slated in the years to come.
  • Labor has committed to rebalance the Liberal Government’s population targets to ensure growth is shared more equitably across Sydney. Development around Metro stations is now to be expected. Nevertheless as density increases in areas like Epping and Carlingford, this must be balanced with amenity, improved retail offerings, basic services like banks and post offices, children’s recreational facilities, greenery and open space.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

10What are 3 key things you plan to achieve if elected?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  1. Better Planning, Heritage, Culture and Arts: opposing unsustainable development and supporting better planning, with priority on genuine community consultation to deliver on feedback; and promoting Parramatta’s outstanding Aboriginal, multicultural, natural and built heritage.
  2. Creating a Jobs-Rich, Clean Energy Future: thousands more secure, well paid jobs by addressing extreme heat; supporting solar energy, more trees, water parks, green spaces, energy efficiency and early intervention against heat stress health risks.
  3. More Quality Public Services Not Privatisation: genuinely affordable housing; free, quality public transport and education including preschool, school and TAFE; increased staff at Westmead an Ryde hospitals; more trains, electric buses and cycleways, reducing noise impacts of the M2 motorway and the future 24 x 7 Western Sydney Airport flight paths; and improved community services.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  1. Upgrade Ryde Hospital into a major, state-of-the-art facility with safe staffing levels. This is overdue given population growth.
  2. A weekly $60 toll cap as a two-year cost-of-living relief measure. This will help motorists using the M4, M2 and Lane Cove Tunnel, taking pressure off local roads.
  3. Finally in education, Labor will convert 10,000 casual teachers to permanent staff. As mentioned, I’m also excited we will establish a free Literacy and Numeracy Tuition Program in all public schools from July 1 this year, supplementing existing coaching services.

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • We’re already taking action to help household budgets and I know that a little bit of help to ease the pressure can make a big difference. One example I really want to highlight is the Back to School Voucher: $150 for each school child to cut the cost of getting your kids back in the classroom. And we’re also helping families save with:
    • $500 Before and After School Care
    • $100 Active Kids
    • $100 Creative Kids
    • $100 First Lap Vouchers
    • Up to $4,220 per year in Preschool Fee Relief
  • I will continue to invest in key infrastructure projects. At the 2019 election I promised a new school in Epping and I’m so excited that Ngarala Public School has opened its doors on day one, term one this year. The Liberal Government I lead will deliver a major upgrade to Carlingford West and Cumberland High public schools, as well as other upgrades to schools across the electorate.
  • I look forward to delivering later this year a brand new Service NSW centre in North Rocks Shopping Centre which will make it easier for locals to access important NSW Government services and transactions, including vehicle registration, Working with Children Checks, Seniors Card applications, trades licences, driver licences and driver testing.
  • In Dundas Valley I will deliver a new ambulance station which means more frontline staff and better services in our local community. This investment is part of a record $1.76 billion over the next 4 years and will see more than 2,000 extra staff and 30 new ambulance stations across NSW.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

11Is there anything else you’d like to share with residents in your electorate?

Phil Bradley (The Greens)

  • Yes. I think there needs to be much better genuine community consultation and empowerment in the planning process and more generally in government decision making.
  • The Greens also support more transparency and much stronger anti-corruption measures, including the banning of inappropriate influential political donations such as by developers and the property industry which are still allowed to continue at the Federal Party level.
  • It is reported on the website Democracy for Sale based on Australian Electoral Commission data, that developers and the property industry donated about $1 million to the Labor Party and $3 million to the Liberal/National Party Coalition, and the Fossil Fuel Industry about $1 million to each of them. In the meanwhile, The Greens want such donations capped and reportable in real time BEFORE elections, not many months after them like now.
  • The Greens NSW party does not accept donations from corporations, so is not indebted to them, nor are individual Greens members like me.

Alan Mascarenhas (Labor Party)

  • It’s time for change in NSW. The Liberals have had 12 years to do their best. Whatever their achievements, they now look tired, scandal-ridden and spent. But it’s also time for change locally – in suburbs like Epping, Carlingford and surrounding areas that desperately need a local MP who is focused and working hard for you.
  • I’m passionate, energetic and idealistic – and I want to go in and refresh the system. Humbly, I am asking the parents of Epping for the chance to serve.

Bradley Molloy (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Dominic Perrottet (Liberal Party)

  • I want to make sure that Epping continues to be a great place to live, work and raise a family.
  • That means continuing to build on the benefits that Epping has from being so closely connected to the CBD and Parramatta. And it means ensuring that people have access to the local infrastructure they need: schools and childcare, emergency services and healthcare.
  • It also means protecting the existing way of life we have in our quiet leafy suburbs. As local MP, I have consistently opposed high-rise residential developments, and I will fight to protect our local heritage sites. I want to ensure that the area maintains its community feel, with a network of local schools, shops, and neighbourhoods.

Carmen Terceiro (Animal Justice Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Victor Waterson (Independent)

  • [yet to provide answer]

NSW State Election 2023 – General Info

What Are We Voting For?

The 58th Parliament of New South Wales, including all 93 seats in the NSW Legislative Assembly. Plus 21 of the 42 seats in the NSW Legislative Council.

What is the Role of the NSW Parliament?

With three levels of government in Australia, it can be confusing to know who looks after what. The State Parliament makes laws on matters such as:

  • police
  • schools and hospitals
  • state transport, roads and railways
  • housing services
  • community services

When Do I Need to Vote?

NSW Election Day is Saturday 25th March and voting is between 8am and 6pm. Some voting centres or polling places keep different hours so be sure to check. And don’t leave it to the last minute! You’ll need up to an hour to vote in busy times.

You can also vote before Election Day – it’s called pre-polling (when in person) – and early voting starts from 18th March 2023.

Who Needs to Vote?

Voting is compulsory for all Australian citizens who live in NSW and are 18 years of age or older. Fines apply for not voting. You can check your enrolment to vote if unsure.

What Do I Need to Vote?

Take your licence or other photo identification, or something with your current residential address on it. You may also want to take some money to buy a famous election sausage sizzle and support your local school, church or community group. And bring a bottle of water in case you have to wait a long time. Comfy shoes are a good idea as well!

Where Can I Vote?

Voting in person on Election Day (25th March) is still the way a lot of people vote in NSW. It’s generally quick and easy to vote in person at a voting centre or polling place, often at a local school. And election staff and officials are available if you need help. Plus you can usually enjoy a sausage sizzle or cake stall while you wait to vote.

If you would like vote in person, but you are unable to get to a voting centre or polling place on Election Day, you may be eligible to vote early or pre-poll. Early voting for the NSW State election opens from Monday 18th March until Friday 24th March.

The local early voting centres can be found at the following locations and are open Mon-Wed 8:30am to 5:30pm; Thur 8:30am to 8pm; Fri 8:30am to 6pm; Sat 9am to 6pm; closed Sundays.

  • Parramatta: Phive Makers Space, 5 Parramatta Square, level 3. I
  • Ermington: Ermington Community Centre, 6 River Road. It’s open Mon-Wed 8:30am to 5:30pm; Thur 8:30am to 8pm; Fri 8:30am to 6pm; Sat 9am to 6pm; closed Sundays.
  • Wentworth Point: Pulse Centre, 9 The Crescent

You can also vote by post/ mail – applications close 20th March.

There are two papers you will be required to fill out on Election Day to vote:

  1. Small paper is Legislative Assembly (lower house of NSW parliament)
  2. Large paper is Legislative Council (upper house of NSW parliament)

You will be given choices on each paper of which individuals or parties you would like to give your vote to. You may choose on each paper to simply put a 1 next to the candidate of your choice. But you may number more if you wish. It’s different for each paper.

  • For Legislative Assembly ballot paper (small): A candidate has to receive 50% of all votes+1 to be elected. This is called an ‘absolute majority’. If the candidate you have voted 1 for, does not have enough votes to be elected, votes are re-sorted to the other candidates remaining, according to the second preference. This is why some people choose to vote by numbering their 2nd, 3rd and 4th etc preferences. See here for more information on voting in the Legislative Assembly (small paper).
  • For Legislative Council ballot paper (large): You may vote above OR below the line, but not both. You may “Vote 1” for the party you prefer ABOVE the line (listed as “Groups”). This is the minimum you need to do to vote. But you may further empower your vote for other preferred parties by labelling 2, 3, 4 etc above the line, and preferences apply, as for the lower house. If you choose to vote BELOW the line you must number a minimum of 15 boxes. See here for more information about voting for the Legislative Council.

Some “how to vote” cards suggest preferences but you are free to vote for any candidate or party you wish. And give your preferences (2nd 3rd 4th choices) to anyone you wish.

13What Do I Do After Voting?

Enjoy a (democracy) sausage sizzle, return your how to vote papers to the party for reuse and politely decline any more. A simple “I’ve voted”, or “no thank you” should keep unwanted party politics away.

If interested tune in to TV coverage after 6pm and have your own political watch party!! Results and trends often become clear on the night of election day.

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