On Saturday 25th March we get to vote for the 58th Parliament of New South Wales. This includes all 93 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, including the Granville electorate. Plus 21 of the 42 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Council.

As we approach 25th March, there’s a lot of media coverage about the election – but it can be hard to actually find out information about the local candidates and what they stand for. Chances are most of us won’t get along to a meet the candidates forum and won’t get to speak with the candidate directly. So to make it easier to get to know the candidates, we developed a set of 10 questions. And asked each candidate in the Granville electorate to answer them. Plus four other electorates – Auburn, Epping, Parramatta, Winston Hills.

| About Granville Electorate | Meet the Granville Candidates | Candidate AnswersAbout the State Election |

We sent our candidate survey to all candidates listed on the Electoral Commission website on Sunday 12th March, after candidate nominations closed and ballots drawn. We strongly believe it’s in everyone’s interest for all candidates to provide responses. And we welcome your support in encouraging them to do so.

We appreciate candidates making the time to respond, particularly given how busy it is for them in the lead up to the election. Candidate participation is purely voluntary. The responses have been provided by the candidates themselves and have only been formatted, not edited (even to correct spelling or grammatical errors). Where a candidate did not provide information, we have written NO RESPONSE RECEIVED.

ParraParents is not aligned with any political party or candidate. We have collected this information to help you make an informed decision when voting in the 2023 NSW state election.


About the Granville Electorate

Granville electorate NSW State Election 2023

The Granville electorate is 29 square kilometres and includes all or part of the following suburbs: Guildford, Guildford West, Granville, Merrylands, South Granville and South Wentworthville.

Learn about the Granville electorates history, geography, political situation and results of the 2019 election by checking out the Tally Room’s election guide.


Meet the Candidates for Granville

Here are the 6 candidates running in the Granville electorate. Here they are, listed in alphabetical order by surname.

This election, the Daily Telegraph has interviewed the candidates and if you have a subscription, you can read more about the candidates here.


Candidate Answers

We’ve provided candidate answers together for each question. Use the links below to jump to the different questions, or just keep scrolling through.

  1. Connection to Granville
  2. Interesting Facts About the Candidate
  3. Achievements
  4. Main Issues Affecting Granville
  5. Key Issue Affecting Families
  6. Population Growth, Development and Community Infrastructure
  7. Local Schools
  8. Changing Climate
  9. Planning System
  10. What They Plan to Achieve
  11. Other Comments

Note: Candidate answers have been provided in the order in which they were received. They are provided as received, with minor formatting and spelling corrections.


1What is your connection with your electorate (including how long you have lived in the area) and what you like about it?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  • I was born in Westmead Hospital and have lived in the area for over 20 years . I like the area as it is close to Sydney’s 2nd largest CBD and gives you easy access to most parts of Sydney. I love my food and appreciate the area’s wide range of cuisine. Being a rugby league fan, I love that it is close to Stadiums in both Parramatta and Olympic Park.

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • I was delighted to win Granville for NSW Labor in the 2019 and 2015 state elections. I am currently the Shadow Minister for Sport and Shadow Minister for Youth in Chris Minns’ Shadow Cabinet.
  • Previously I served as Councillor and Lord Mayor on the former Parramatta City Council from 1999-2016. As a Councillor, I advocated for our community ensuring we get our fair share and I fought to retain local services such as Council run childcare centres and local pools.
  • One of the great strengths of our area is the cultural diversity of residents. Most people were born overseas or have one/both parents born overseas and this means our multicultural area benefits from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences.
  • Over the years I have enjoyed staying in touch with members of Parraparents and having the opportunity to hear directly from parents about local concerns.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • I came to Australia in 1994 and have been living in the Merrylands/Guildford area for the past 29 years.
  • The Granville district is an incredible, close-knit multicultural community, with hardworking families contributing daily to this wonderful land. I have many friends and relatives from so many backgrounds, and we all share similar upbringings, including cultural values, so in many ways it feels like home away from home.
  • I studied, worked, volunteered, played sports, etc…, and I would not change my wonderful experiences for the world.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

2What are 3 things people might not know about you?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  1. I have run as a State candidate twice (2019 Granville, 2022 Strathfield by-election) and a Federal candidate twice (2019 Reid, 2022 Parramatta)
  2. I am a twin.
  3. I have not consumed meat, dairy, eggs or fish in nearly 5 years.

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • I have lived in the Parramatta area for almost 30 years with my husband Leigh and our favourite park for running/walking is Parramatta Park. Our dog Knox recently passed away but we now have puppy Hugo in our home.
  • I graduated with Master of Social Science (International Development), Master of Environmental Studies and Bachelor of Arts. I was employed in senior roles in the Motor Accidents Authority, Transport for NSW, Housing NSW and the Department of Water and Energy.
  • My favourite colour is yellow, my favourite food is Indian food and my favourite leisure activity is photography.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • I have a bachelor of Medical Science degree
  • I am a Justice of the Peace
  • I read, speak, write and understand up to 4 languages

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

3What have you already achieved for/ in the electorate?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • Over the last eight years I fought for a major safety upgrade to the Church St off-ramp after the reintroduced M4 toll caused endless traffic and safety problems as motorists exited the M4 in droves, avoiding the toll.
  • I lobbied for several years for Service NSW to re-open in Merrylands after the motor registry closed in 2016.
  • We fought to keep Wenty pool open three times and we won. Local people made their voice heard when they overwhelming voted to keep local pools open in the 2017 referendum after the attempts by the Liberal-appointed Administrator of Cumberland Council to close the pool and the demolition of Parramatta War Memorial Pool by the Liberal NSW Government.
  • I have raised concerns about overcrowding at Westmead Public School in the Parliament and with both sides of politics – before COVID-19 it was the biggest public primary school in the State. The academic results are outstanding but the schoolkids are suffering from lack of space to play at lunch and there are over 20 demountable classrooms.
  • Labor will build a new public primary school in Westmead.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • I perform many volunteer duties, including SES, helping non-English speaking residents, Justice of the Peace duties, patient support, etc…, and I witness firsthand the effects people go through, especially the elderly, who usually live alone and don’t receive enough support from the government.
  • I hope I can be a bigger voice for them and the whole community if given the opportunity and achieve bigger things for our electorate.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

4What do you see as the main issues affecting your electorate? (limit to 5)

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  1. Climate Change
  2. Education/awareness on Health
  3. Cost of Living
  4. Transportation
  5. Companion Animal management – desexing, veticare, ‘adopt dont shop’

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  1. We’ll make NSW’s education system world-class again, rejuvenating our preschools, schools and TAFE.
  2. We’ll repair and rebuild our health system after 12 years of neglect.
  3. We’ll increase access to affordable and reliable transport and cap road tolls to reduce the burden on the family budget.
  4. We’ll make good, sustainable housing attainable for buyers and renters.
  5. We’ll end the privatisation of our energy assets and create a state-owned clean energy corporation to deliver cleaner and more reliable energy.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • I think the increase of asylum seekers in the Granville area has put a lot of pressure on the residents because many of them have escaped war-torn countries and they don’t have the language skills or the educational skills to assimilate in Australia. Also, there is a lack of programs that offer accommodation, case workers, access to health care, etc… . Furthermore, other issues such as alcohol and drug addictions, mental health, domestic violence, homelessness and poverty are among the highest in NSW.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

5What is one key issue affecting local families in your electorate and how do you plan to address it?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  • Cost of Living: The major parties need to stop wasting money on industries which provide (relatively) low value to society. For example:
    • Shut down greyhound racing and horse racing industries. There are too many other sports to follow for entertainment. Voiceless animals are being drugged, injured and bred/killed in the thousands when they do not perform. I cannot believe the major parties use taxpayer’s money to fund these cruel industries when they could be put to better use like the cost of living.
    • Apply the brakes on animal agriculture. When the cost of living subsides, we face high long term costs to repair damage of climate change, pandemics and reversible/preventable chronic disease. Animal agriculture is a leading cause of these issues. It is beyond belief that major party Governments around the world subsidies animal agriculture industries when the funds could be used to help families in our country.

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • Dominic Perrottet’s refusal to rule out selling Sydney Water and other vital state-owned assets means we’re risking higher water charges for NSW and over $7 billion lost in dividends to NSW that could be used to help fund schools and hospitals.
  • Four more years of Dominic Perrottet and his privatisation agenda means NSW ends up paying more in the long run. They privatised electricity and now NSW households pay $100 more than needed for power per year, with biggest brunt borne by areas served by privatised electricity networks.
  • NSW Labor is pledging no more privatisation, and a guarantee that NSW’s water infrastructure will stay in public hands.
  • Before the last election, then-Treasurer Dominic Perrottet said they would not sell the Sydney Motorway Corporation. Two years later – they sold it.
  • However, 51,000 drivers each week will have more and better toll relief under NSW Labor’s plan to introduce a $60 weekly toll cap. This will be immediate help to ease the burden of increasing tolls across Sydney and Western Sydney.
  • There’s a clear choice at the next election when it comes to tolls and privatisation in New South Wales. More privatisation and toll roads under Dominic Perrottet and the Liberals.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • One of the biggest issues is the cost of living. Wars around the world, the pandemic, the high energy taxes, etc.. have all contributed to an increase in bills, in particular electricity, fuel prices, child care, water and sewage, property charges, interest rates, hospital and medical services, and the list goes on. These issues must be addressed federally, but as for the current NSW state voucher programs, increasing energy and gas rebates and increasing the dollar amount of the current vouchers that are available must be a priority, even though it is not the full and complete solution.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

6What are your thoughts on projected population growth for your electorate, associated development and community infrastructure?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  • Whether it is a lack of skill in this area or major political parties receiving donations and feeling obliged to approve projects, I do not know but it certainly needs to be looked at by an independent body – a bit like how the RBA manages the cash rate.

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • Central to our future prosperity is the growth of a NSW economy that works in the interests of people – not the other way around. The Liberals have sold off over $90 billion worth of public assets but failed to set our economy up for the future. Since they came to office 12 years ago, the number of people in NSW finishing apprenticeships each year has more than halved; the state has lost 42,000 manufacturing jobs; and NSW gross debt has increased by five times to over $128 billion. And by selling off so many assets, our budget has lost billions of dollars in dividends that were previously reinvested back into essential services like schools and hospitals.
  • Despite this, for years I championed City of Parramatta’s first all-inclusive playground and water play park. It has finally been opened at Ollie Webb Reserve, Parramatta and enables kids of all ages and all abilities to play side by side. As a Councillor on the former Parramatta City Council I secured the initial $330,000 in funding for the project.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • The nightlife in the Granville district is buzzing and has been on the rise for many years. However, an increasing population results in issues such as slow traffic flow and car parking availability. It is important to support a thriving community with community infrastructure to assist local businesses and create local jobs for the community.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

7Please share your thoughts on local schools in your electorate and what they need

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  • Facilities are important but what I see as more important is proper education on diet as this will shape the child’s life as they grow up as well as (perhaps) their children’s. Page 35 of the Australian Dietary Guidelines states “Those following a strict vegan (plant based) diet can meet nutrient requirements”
  • “Shifting diets from meat and other animal products to plant-based diets (vegan) has a high potential for reducing carbon footprints and mitigating climate change, as well as improving human health, according to Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, a report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.”
  • It beggars belief Government isn’t proactive in educating us on plant based diets, given human health and climate change are important in the electorate.

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • The current school was the biggest public school in NSW prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and now has around 1000 students. They need proper classrooms. Westmead Public School is bursting at the seams. That’s why Labor will build a new public primary school in Westmead.
  • There is clear choice when it comes to education.
  • Under 12 years of the Liberals and Nationals, we now have a situation where teacher resignations have overtaken retirements.
  • Labor has a plan for a fresh start for schools and education in NSW, which includes:
    • Ending the chronic underfunding of NSW public schools;
    • Converting 10,000 temporary teachers to permanent positions to reduce the reliance on temporary teachers;
    • Cutting admin hours for teachers by five hours per week;
    • Ending the failed overseas recruitment program and redirecting resources towards recruiting NSW teaching students into schools;
    • Creating a permanent, targeted Literacy and Numeracy tutoring program across primary and high schools;
    • Banning the use of mobile phones in all NSW public schools to reduce distraction, cyberbullying and improve education outcomes;
    • New co-located preschools, with 100 new public preschools and 50 new and expanded preschools at Catholic and Independent schools.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • The schools in the Granville district consist of students from a variety of third world countries, and most of them have parents who have never been to school or missed out on school due to poverty and war. An increase in targeted individual support, especially for the newly arrived or refugee students who need support in the English language, will go a long way in easing their difficult transition into a new life in a new country.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

8Western Sydney keeps getting hotter! It can be costly for families (and others) to keep cool and our changing climate impacts on health and wellbeing. What do you think is needed and what do you commit to doing?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  • In addition to 3,5,7 where I addressed ‘diet change for climate change’ , the Animal Justice Party and I will commit to:
    -No new coal, gas or oil
    -A renewable energy target of 100% by 2030
    -Support farmers to transition to sustainable agriculture.
  • I will continue volunteering on the streets to help people transition to a more sustainable plant based diet. Helping reduce consumer demand will leave farmers no choice but to transition to sustainable agriculture. It would also make sense for Governments around the world to not subsidise this industry which wreaks havoc on the environment and human health.

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • A Minns Labor Government will legislate our emissions reduction targets of net zero by 2050 and establish the Net Zero Commission to help us get there.
  • NSW Labor will also open up Prospect Reservoir for recreational activities to give families in Western Sydney a place to swim and enjoy the outdoors.
  • NSW Labor will conduct a rapid feasibility study in government to inform the best way to open Prospect Reservoir for swimming and non-motorised water craft, what amenities upgrades are required, as well as ensuring there are no impacts on water supply. Prospect Reservoir will then be opened for use for swimming, recreation around the shore, kayaking and non-motorised craft, and where possible a section available for fishing from the shore.
  • South Australia, Queensland, and the ACT have all safely opened up water supply dams and reservoirs for recreation or fishing – and given how rare outdoor water areas are for the large parts of Sydney who don’t live on the coast, it’s about time NSW did the same.
  • A NSW Labor Government will work with local governments to provide lifeguard services for the reservoir.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • As a Western Sydney University graduate, I keep up to date with university research on the effects of our changing climate, especially in different suburbs and locations in Western Sydney. Research conducted by Dr Sebastian Pfautsch reveals that streets or suburbs with more trees had lower temperatures by up to 10 degrees during extremely hot days. This is a good start; however, trees take a very long time to grow and maintain, and more research is needed to find alternatives. For example, nuclear power plants are another option because they use uranium to generate steam, which drives a generator to produce electricity. 1 kilogram of uranium is equivalent to around 22,000 kilograms of coal.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

9What are your thoughts on the current planning system, in particular complying development? And what, if any, improvements do you want to see?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  • See 6

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • Without doubt, local people want good government services and yet we have been forgotten by the Liberal Government. Western Sydney is bearing the brunt of the Liberal Government’s plans for overdevelopment whereas leafy North Shore suburbs like Mosman and Hunters Hill are let off the hook.
  • From giant towers next to downgraded Granville station, to empty shops in Wentworthville, our community has had enough.
  • As part of the 2022/23 Half Yearly Budget Review, the Perrottet Government was banking on an amended Special Infrastructure Contribution (SIC) despite no legislation having passed the house. The government unsuccessfully attempted to introduce this tax in 2022 – but faced significant backlash from many NSW councils.
  • The reforms would effectively mean that developer contributions collected in one local government area (LGA) could be spent elsewhere at the discretion of the state government. After 12 long years, the Perrottet Government should not be ambushing councils and local rate payers with nearly a billion in fictional taxes to clean up his budget mess.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • In recent years, there has been an increase in high-rise apartments, and this has created extremely slow vehicle traffic flow and made it harder to find street parking. Furthermore, new houses require a water tank to slow down water wastage; however, high-rise buildings contain many showers, toilets, laundries and kitchens that will use or waste a lot more water than your average home. Perhaps a water cycling system should be introduced to high-rise buildings, or development control should be reviewed and applied constantly.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

10What are 3 key things you plan to achieve if elected?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  1. Protect our beloved pets: Allow pets on public transport, shut down puppy farms, protect renters’ right to have pets by default. The landlord would still be able to appeal against this and will have bond money should anything untoward happen. I am yet to hear within my various networks of companion animals damaging property.
  2. Save our Wildlife – Urgent action to save koalas. End the commercial kangaroo industry. Ban shark nets. Protect marine parks. End land clearing. Protect native forests.
  3. End Factory Farming – We must end the horror of factory farming. Rapid phase-out of battery hens and so stalls. End live export.

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

NSW Labor and I have a Fresh Start Plan for NSW:

  1. More and better toll relief for drivers – a $60 weekly toll cap and Review the railway timetable to reverse the cuts to express services at Granville station.
  2. Address the teacher shortage by converting 10,000 existing casual and temporary teachers to permanent positions and Lift standards and cut down on distractions by banning the use of mobile phones in high school classrooms.
  3. Introduce minimum and enforceable Safe Staffing levels in our public hospitals, starting with Emergency Departments.

At this election there is a clear choice: more of the same neglect and sell-offs from the Liberals – or Chris Minns and Labor’s Fresh Start Plan for NSW.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • Traditional family values
    • Protecting parents voices in their children’s education
    • Keeping social and identity politics out of our schools and community programs
    • Strong advocate for people of faith
  • Support local businesses
    • Be a strong voice for small businesses
    • Fight for less red tape and more freedoms for business owners
    • Introduce small business assistance programs
    • More funding for public amenities and initiatives that drive local business
  • Cost of living
    • Host regular forums to hear what families are financially struggling with
    • Supporting the increase in the minimum wage
    • Fight for capping fuel and energy prices
    • Support programs that assist people on welfare payments

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

11Is there anything else you’d like to share with residents in your electorate?

Rohan Laxmanalal (Animal Justice Party)

  • Preference voting flows from small parties to big parties – not the other way around so a #2 vote for me is the same as voting me last. The best way to show support to Animal Justice Party is vote us at #1 on both ballot papers.
  • If I don’t win, your vote goes to your next preference at full value so your vote is never wasted. How good is that! Number the boxes as per the instructions otherwise your vote won’t count.
  • Tell your family and friends about our achievements in parliament

Julia Finn (Labor Party)

  • In summary, good government is about delivering on what matters to the community and building a better future for you, your family and businesses in NSW
  • Our Fresh Start Plan does just that by building on six key pillars:
    • 1. Education for Life – Labor will make NSW’s education system a foundation of opportunities for people and the economy, rejuvenating our preschools and TAFE.
    • 2. Healthcare – Labor will repair and rebuild our health system.
    • 3. Roads and Transport – Labor will ensure communities can access an affordable and reliable transport system, and reduce the burden of tolls on the family budget.
    • 4. Housing Affordability – Labor will make good, sustainable housing attainable for buyers and renters.
    • 5. Energy and Renewables – Labor will end the privatisation of our energy assets and legislate our commitment to net zero by 2050.
    • 6. Economy and Jobs – Labor will build an economy that is resilient and works for people and small businesses – not the other way around.

Charbel Saad (Independent)

  • Always remember that an independent works for the community, not a party; therefore, my objectives are community-driven and not party-driven. Furthermore, lobbyists, political donors, industry, and corporate bodies corrupt and influence political systems, especially the leaders of the parties, in order to satisfy their vested interests. Moreover, propaganda, biased reporting and misleading information by the mainstream media are swept under the rug with no one held responsible, as they have a duty and responsibility to be as accurate and truthful as possible.

Janet Castle (The Greens)

  • [yet to provide answer]

John Hadchiti (Liberal Democrats)

  • [yet to provide answer]

Anm Masum (Liberal Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

NSW State Election 2023 – General Info

What Are We Voting For?

The 58th Parliament of New South Wales, including all 93 seats in the NSW Legislative Assembly. Plus 21 of the 42 seats in the NSW Legislative Council.

What is the Role of the NSW Parliament?

With three levels of government in Australia, it can be confusing to know who looks after what. The State Parliament makes laws on matters such as:

  • police
  • schools and hospitals
  • state transport, roads and railways
  • housing services
  • community services

When Do I Need to Vote?

NSW Election Day is Saturday 25th March and voting is between 8am and 6pm. Some voting centres or polling places keep different hours so be sure to check. And don’t leave it to the last minute! You’ll need up to an hour to vote in busy times.

You can also vote before Election Day – it’s called pre-polling (when in person) – and early voting starts from 18th March 2023.

Who Needs to Vote?

Voting is compulsory for all Australian citizens who live in NSW and are 18 years of age or older. Fines apply for not voting. You can check your enrolment to vote if unsure.

What Do I Need to Vote?

Take your licence or other photo identification, or something with your current residential address on it. You may also want to take some money to buy a famous election sausage sizzle and support your local school, church or community group. And bring a bottle of water in case you have to wait a long time. Comfy shoes are a good idea as well!

Where Can I Vote?

Voting in person on Election Day (25th March) is still the way a lot of people vote in NSW. It’s generally quick and easy to vote in person at a voting centre or polling place, often at a local school. And election staff and officials are available if you need help. Plus you can usually enjoy a sausage sizzle or cake stall while you wait to vote.

If you would like vote in person, but you are unable to get to a voting centre or polling place on Election Day, you may be eligible to vote early or pre-poll. Early voting for the NSW State election opens from Monday 18th March until Friday 24th March.

The local early voting centres can be found at the following locations and are open Mon-Wed 8:30am to 5:30pm; Thur 8:30am to 8pm; Fri 8:30am to 6pm; Sat 9am to 6pm; closed Sundays.

  • Parramatta: Phive Makers Space, 5 Parramatta Square, level 3. I
  • Ermington: Ermington Community Centre, 6 River Road. It’s open Mon-Wed 8:30am to 5:30pm; Thur 8:30am to 8pm; Fri 8:30am to 6pm; Sat 9am to 6pm; closed Sundays.
  • Wentworth Point: Pulse Centre, 9 The Crescent

You can also vote by post/ mail – applications close 20th March.

How is My Vote Counted?

There are two papers you will be required to fill out on Election Day to vote:

  1. Small paper is Legislative Assembly (lower house of NSW parliament)
  2. Large paper is Legislative Council (upper house of NSW parliament)

You will be given choices on each paper of which individuals or parties you would like to give your vote to. You may choose on each paper to simply put a 1 next to the candidate of your choice. But you may number more if you wish. It’s different for each paper.

  • For Legislative Assembly ballot paper (small): A candidate has to receive 50% of all votes+1 to be elected. This is called an ‘absolute majority’. If the candidate you have voted 1 for, does not have enough votes to be elected, votes are re-sorted to the other candidates remaining, according to the second preference. This is why some people choose to vote by numbering their 2nd, 3rd and 4th etc preferences. See here for more information on voting in the Legislative Assembly (small paper).
  • For Legislative Council ballot paper (large): You may vote above OR below the line, but not both. You may “Vote 1” for the party you prefer ABOVE the line (listed as “Groups”). This is the minimum you need to do to vote. But you may further empower your vote for other preferred parties by labelling 2, 3, 4 etc above the line, and preferences apply, as for the lower house. If you choose to vote BELOW the line you must number a minimum of 15 boxes. See here for more information about voting for the Legislative Council.

Some “how to vote” cards suggest preferences but you are free to vote for any candidate or party you wish. And give your preferences (2nd 3rd 4th choices) to anyone you wish.

What Do I Do After Voting?

Enjoy a (democracy) sausage sizzle, return your how to vote papers to the party for reuse and politely decline any more. A simple “I’ve voted”, or “no thank you” should keep unwanted party politics away.

If interested tune in to TV coverage after 6pm and have your own political watch party!! Results and trends often become clear on the night of election day.

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