On Saturday 25th March we get to vote for the 58th Parliament of New South Wales. This includes all 93 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, including the Parramatta electorate. Plus 21 of the 42 seats in the New South Wales Legislative Council.

NSW Election 2023 Parramatta

As we approach 25th March, there’s a lot of media coverage about the election – but it can be hard to actually find out information about the local candidates and what they stand for. Chances are most of us won’t get along to a meet the candidates forum and won’t get to speak with the candidate directly. So to make it easier to get to know the candidates, we developed a set of 10 questions. And asked each candidate in the Parramatta electorate to answer them. Plus four other electorates – Auburn, Epping, Granville, Winston Hills.

| About Parramatta Electorate | Meet the Parramatta Candidates | Candidate AnswersAbout the State Election |

We sent our candidate survey to all candidates listed on the Electoral Commission website on Sunday 12th March, after candidate nominations closed and ballots drawn. We strongly believe it’s in everyone’s interest for all candidates to provide responses. And we welcome your support in encouraging them to do so.

We appreciate candidates making the time to respond, particularly given how busy it is for them in the lead up to the election. Candidate participation is purely voluntary. The responses have been provided by the candidates themselves and have only been formatted, not edited (even to correct spelling or grammatical errors). Where a candidate did not provide information, we have written NO RESPONSE RECEIVED.

ParraParents is not aligned with any political party or candidate. We have collected this information to help you make an informed decision when voting in the 2023 NSW state election.


About the Parramatta Electorate

Electoral Map Parramatta March 2023

The Parramatta electorate is 38 square kilometres and includes all or part of the following suburbs: Camellia, Dundas, Ermington, Granville, Harris Park, Melrose Park, Newington, North Parramatta, Parramatta, Rosehill, Rydalmere, Silverwater, Wentworth Point and Westmead.

Learn about the Parramatta electorates history, geography, political situation and results of the 2019 election by checking out the Tally Room’s election guide.

NOTE: there was a re-distribution in 2021 of the Parramatta electorate, resulting in it shifting south to Kissing Point Road (as the northern boundary) and Wentworth Point.


Meet the Candidates for Parramatta

Here are the 5 candidates running in the Parramatta electorate. Here they are, listed in alphabetical order by surname.

This election, the Daily Telegraph has interviewed the candidates and if you have a subscription, you can read more about the candidates here.


Candidate Answers

We’ve provided 3 candidates written answers together for each question. Use the links below to jump to the different questions, or just keep scrolling through.

For Donna Davis (Labor candidate), her answers were provided via a Live Q&A, which you can watch here.

  1. Connection to Parramatta
  2. Interesting Facts About the Candidate
  3. Achievements
  4. Main Issues Affecting Parramatta
  5. Key Issue Affecting Families
  6. Population Growth, Development and Community Infrastructure
  7. Local Schools
  8. Changing Climate
  9. Planning System
  10. What They Plan to Achieve
  11. Other Comments

Note: Candidate answers have been provided in the order in which they were received. They are provided as received, with minor formatting and spelling corrections. We’ve included written answers for Donna Davis for some questions from her response to the Ryde District Mums survey.


1What is your connection with the Parramatta electorate (including how long you have lived in the area) and what you like about it?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  • I was born in Westmead and grew up in Blacktown. I have spent the majority of my life in Western Sydney, except for overseas study or travel for work when I was an itinerant agricultural labourer during the pandemic. I now live and work in Harris Park with my fiancé and our cat, where I work with data to optimise safety procedures on job sites. I eat, sleep, live, work and play in Parramatta. I love this community, I’ve watched it change and grow so much since I was a kid. I am committed to making sure that Parramatta remains a wonderful area to live in, and not a non-cohesive pincushion of

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • I have established and with the other volunteers continue to run a Hindi Community Language School in Parramatta for more than 5 years.
  • 50% of of my work from where I earn my livelihood is located in Parramatta CBD.
  • I run a community library which is just a about 200meters from the edge of the Parramatta Constituency and most of the clients are from Parramatta constituency.
  • My extended family lives in and around Parramatta area. I have business interest in Parramatta and I know the potential and pain a suffering of the people in and around Parramatta.
  • I have run and managed multiple community events and I have great connections with youth, families and senior citizens of the Parramatta.
  • Parramatta is the best reflection of the Multicultural Australia. Its cultural diversity and potential of the youth is immense. Parramatta is full of hard working people and they make the clock tick here.
  • Parramatta is centrally located in Sydney and it will become the future meeting ground for most people if the businesses are given the right support and if we are able to improve public amenities and reduce traffic congestion and improve parking facilities.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • I have lived in Parramatta for almost my entire adult life since moving here to study for University and falling in love with this area.
  • As a local lawyer for the past 15 years, I have experience helping the residents, families, and the small businesses of Parramatta.
  • I am a supporter of numerous community organisations, including the Riverside Theatres, Parramatta Eels and Western Sydney Wanderers FC. I am also an active member of a local Toastmasters Branch.
  • I worked as a waitress at local businesses to put myself through university, and then got a job as a legal secretary working in the day, studying at night to obtain my law degree.
  • It really comes full circle to now have the opportunity to represent the people and businesses of Parramatta in Parliament.

Donna Davis (Labor) – See Live Q&A on Facebook

  • I have had the privilege of serving our community as a local Councillor, Lord Mayor of Parramatta, and now as your Labor Candidate. My priority has always been listening to our community.
  • I’ve lived locally for almost thirty years, raising my two children here with my husband Michael.
  • I love our sense of community. Parramatta locals feel a strong connection to this place. There’s a real sense of pride about living in the heart of Sydney in a place that celebrates and embraces diversity. I love our area’s rich heritage and history. I love the sense that Parramatta is a place of opportunity whether you are a student, an employee, a business owner, a long time resident or a new migrant.

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

2What are 3 things people might not know about you?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  1. I have a B.Arts Distinction in History, Political Thought, International Relations and Asian studies. I nearly completed a Masters of Research in European Union – Russia Studies in Estonia, but this was derailed by Covid-19. I also studied democracy and governance in Tokyo. I bring a broad social and international perspective that many MPs may lack.
  2. I play Volleyball at the Doyle Grounds, I cycle in Parramatta park and I shop on Wigram st. I’m a true local supporting local businesses and facilities.
  3. I am studying Cantonese, having previously studied Estonian and Japanese!

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  1. I am a High School Teacher. I have worked in some of the so called ‘difficult to teach’ schools and also in some of the most successful schools both in Private and Public Sector. I am a History and Mathematics teachers, and I have been recognised for producing some of the best HSC results in Mathematics.
  2. I have the courage to state what is wrong in NSW school education and why the educational outcomes are falling continuously over the last 20 years.
  3. I run a public library and community language school in the area and am closely linked with community

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • I make candles as a hobby when I have some spare time. I give them to friends and family on their birthdays.
  • Before I moved to Parramatta, I thought I was the first in my family to live in the Parramatta electorate, but I later discovered that my Nanna grew up in Granville and my Great Auntie worked in the same street I do! It seems this was my destined natural home.
  • I’m actually the first person in my family to get a university degree. After I succeeded in this way, I encouraged my mum to study and she got a degree in her 50’s.

Donna Davis (Labor)

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

3What have you already achieved for/ in the Parramatta electorate?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

The Greens have won;

  • During the COVID-19 crisis, the Greens fought for better protections for renters, and we secured a ban on evictions and rent increases for tenants. Our advocacy has meant that all parties now support a ban on unfair evictions.
  • We included Dental Care into Medicare for children, but we won’t stop fighting until dental care is fully covered for all!
  • On Parramatta Council, the Greens have fought excessive uplift in development plans and fought for more funds for planning and infrastructure to facilitate our growing population.

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • I have established the Hindi Community Language School in Parramatta and with the help of volunteers we continue to run it successfully for more than 5 years. I spend most of my Sundays organising community events and teaching languages.
  • I work as an educationalist delivering professional development courses for HSC teachers from Parramatta and continue to work towards the upliftment of educational standards of our students all over NSW.
    I am part of a group of volunteers who have delivered essential goods to people during the time of covid crisis in and around Parramatta.
    I run a community library which is very popular among the children and elders groups from Sub-continental community.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • It is my hope to be able to represent Parramatta and continue the great work that Geoff Lee been doing. As a result of Geoff’s advocacy and the Liberal Government’s strong economic management of our economy a re-elected Liberal Government will be able to:
    • invest $56M for Parramatta Park with a pedestrian bridge, a 3.2km path for walkers, runners and riders, and restoring historic Glengarriff House and Wistaria Gardens.
    • deliver Stage 2 of the redevelopment of the Children’s Hospital at Westmead. A new state-of-the-art $619 million Paediatric Services Building will be built, which will house the largest critical care unit for kids in Australia.
    • Open the Mother and Baby Unit at Westmead Hospital which will provide care and support for new mothers and their infants.
    • Deliver a new home for the PCYC in Parramatta.
    • Transform the GWS GIANTS’ HQ into a Centre of Excellence expanding community outreach programs, provide a home ground for the AFLW team & provide facilities for the club’s AFL, AFLW and netball teams.
    • Deliver funds to improve safety to girls and women in local sport by upgrading important lights in Netball Central at Sydney Olympic Park delivering significant lighting upgrades for six (6) indoor netball courts, all walkways, changerooms, function room, gymnasium, external areas and Netball NSW office spaces.

Donna Davis (Labor)

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

4What do you see as the main issues affecting your electorate? (limit to 5)

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  1. Renters in Parramatta need stronger rights to protect them against massive rent hikes. Rents are rising four times faster than wages – in some cases by 30% since the start of the pandemic.
  2. Fossil fuels are the leading cause of the climate crisis. Coal and gas are causing more extreme floods, and the Parramatta river represents an existential crisis. Strong climate action, and protecting salt marshlands are key to making Parramatta resilient and adaptive to the climate crisis.
  3. Women are disproportionately discriminated against in the workplace with lower wages, and workplaces not suited to their needs. Gendered violence is still an epidemic. Women and gender-diverse people, in general, struggle to get their healthcare needs met.
  4. Corporate donations taint the democratic process – they allow big businesses to buy a level of access to politicians that ordinary people can’t afford. Over the last ten years corporate donors have handed federal Labor, Liberal and National parties $23 million a year to peddle influence and buy special treatment. That’s $230 million since 2012.
  5. The Liberals have stopped listening to teachers, are short-changing students, and have no plan to attract and retain teachers in the public system. Our party’s policies on education are written by teachers through the lens of the universal value and benefit to society of well-resourced public education.

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  1. Traffic congestion and lack of conveniences is the main issue in Parramatta. The whole of Parramatta looks like a builders deam but it has caused loss of income and reduced business. Many businesses have closed and others are just pulling along hoping that things will change.
  2. New apartments are built without any plan for school, parks and play area. Families don’t find Parramatta a great place to live in due to lack of good schools around and many would like to move but they can’t due to high rental and ballooning home prices.
  3. Cost of living, including rising engergy prices are hitting the working families and also the seniors of our community very hard.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  1. The rising cost of living is a big problem. The Perrottet Liberal Government has a long-term plan address the cost-of-living concerns. There are already more than 70 rebates and concessions available on Services NSW including Back to School vouchers, Active Kids Vouchers, First Lap, Toll relief and Energy Saver relief.
  2. Another big issue is housing affordability. The Perrottet Liberal Government’s ‘First Home Buyer Choice’ now provides first home buyers purchasing properties for up to $1.5 million the choice to pay an annual property tax instead of stamp duty (transfer duty). Through our ‘Shared Equity Home Buyer’ policy the NSW Liberal Government will contribute up to 40% of the purchase price for new dwellings and 30% for established properties, in exchange for an equivalent interest in the property. The help will be open to single parents of dependent children or first home buyer key workers (nurses, midwives, paramedics, teachers etc). These are just two game changing policies that the government has introduced.
  3. Parramatta has one of the largest rates proportions of renters in Sydney – I know, I am one of them. the Perrottet Liberal government have legislated against rent bidding will introduce reasonable grounds requirement for eviction, extended notice periods, and a rental bond rollover to reduce the financial impact of having to move.

Donna Davis (Labor) – See Live Q&A on Facebook

  1. Cost of living: I know that people across our community are struggling with the rising cost of living – made worse by Dominic Perrottet and the Liberals selling off our electricity network and motorways to private companies. Labor’s Fresh Start Plan will introduce a $60 a week toll cap, and establish a publicly owned clean energy company – putting an end to the privatisation of our energy assets, keeping the lights on, and putting downward pressure on power prices.
  2. Education: As a mum, having raised my two children locally with my husband Michael, I share the hopes and concerns that parents across our community have for their children.That’s why Labor will address the teacher shortage by converting 10,000 existing temporary teacher positions to permanent positions. We will build new public primary schools in Westmead and Sydney Olympic Park. Build new public high schools in Melrose Park and Westmead and establish a permanent literacy and numeracy tutoring program to help students keep up.

     

  3. Healthcare: Our area is growing fast, but investments in out essential services like health care just aren’t keeping pace. That’s why we will introduce minimum and enforceable Safe Staffing Levels in our public hospitals.

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

5What is one key issue affecting local families in your electorate and how do you plan to address it?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  • A decade of Liberal-National government and a global pandemic has left our health system in crisis. Wait times for emergency departments and ambulances have exploded, chronic understaffing and deteriorating working conditions have pushed frontline healthcare workers to protest in the streets, and more and more people can’t afford the care that they need.
  • The Greens have a plan to make sure that if you need to see a doctor, call an ambulance or go to hospital, you will get the care you need, when you need it, at no out-of-pocket cost. We will do this by increasing public services like public dental clinics, public mental health clinics and public GP and allied health clinics. We will look after our health workers with safe staffing ratios in public hospitals and a real wage increase, and we will repair our broken ambulance network.
  • The Greens have already introduced a bill to the NSW Parliament to establish Nurse to Patient Ratios and pushed the Government to give a bonus to nurses. With your vote, you can put the Greens in the balance of power where we can work to fix our healthcare system and provide free healthcare when & where you need it.

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • Housing crisis, general cost of living, rising enegry prices, absence of good schools and increasing crime rates are the main concerns of the Parramatta Citizens. Excessive interest rate is making rental and housing unaffordable and many families are are not only thinking of moving out of Parramatta but also out of Sydney and NSW.
    Traffic congestion and lack of parking has destroyed many local businesses in CBD.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • We need to ensure that the interests of local residents and families are not forgotten as Parramatta grows and develops. This means delivering critical infrastructure so Parramatta locals aren’t spending anymore time on the road than they need to, maintaining our investment in schools so that more of our kids can get a world class education close to home, and continuing our record investment and reform across health so that we make sure families can see GPs faster and receive critical health treatments when they need it.

Donna Davis (Labor)

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

6What are your thoughts on projected population growth for your electorate, associated development and community infrastructure?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  • In a connected, well-planned suburb or town, you shouldn’t have to own a car to access essential services. Improving our active transport networks will reduce traffic congestion, improve air quality, reduce carbon emissions and improve the overall health of communities.
  • It will also make our streets more safe, inclusive and accessible.
  • We want to remove the barriers that stop so many of us walking, wheeling or cycling between our homes and workplaces, shops and cultural places. We will introduce requirements for quality paths to connect urban spaces, including curbs, ramps and platforms, enabling everyone to move through our public spaces safely, including pedestrians, bicyclists, and those with wheeled mobility aids and families with prams.
  • We will also make it easier to ride to where you need to go, by introducing an extended network of bike lanes and racks, creating end-trip facilities at transport hubs, and improving road safety.
  • The Greens believe that New South Wales deserves world-class public transport. Run for the public, by the public. No private profits, no outrageous fares – just services that get you anywhere you want to go, whenever you want to get there.
  • Public transport should be fast, affordable, accessible and reliable.

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • The schools and hospital infrastructructure has not been planned properly when expansion of CBD of Parramatta was planned. The road, train and tram is a big confusion and in time I fear that this is not going to work smoothly. The plan looks so much like someone would have planned 100 years back. Hope right modifications are made and enough affordabel parking is available otherwise, it looks like a disaster for businesses.
    New schools and classrooms are to be planned differently if Parramatta has to be successfully transformed from a suburb into an alternative CBD in Sydney.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • Parramatta is going to continue to grow. It is the most beautiful place in NSW, and that’s why so many people are now moving to Parramatta. We can’t blame people for wanting to live in the best place in NSW. But we need to ensure we manage this.
  • The hundreds of millions invested by the NSW Government has made Parramatta a more liveable city, but we cannot go back to the old days under Labor where development outpaced investment in community infrastructure. While a re-elected Liberal Government will continue to deliver infrastructure, Labor have promised to scrap metro lines to Westmead and the new Western Sydney Airport.

Donna Davis (Labor)

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

7Please share your thoughts on local schools in your electorate and what they need

Ben Hammond (Greens)

Every school is different, but there are some general themes here;

  • Teaching as a profession has been undervalued and gutted by the government. There is a chronic teaching shortage, and the teachers who have remained in the vocation are being crushed under the administrative burden. Almost half of teachers surveyed said that they are considering leaving teaching in the next year. This is not sustainable, and it’s bad for our schools and kids.
  • New schools increasingly do not have libraries and other facilities that are critical to developing our young people’s critical thinking skills. We need to ensure that librarians and support staff are able to come to work to do what they love, and are being fairly compensated.
  • We need to listen to teachers on issues of behaviour and discipline, and we need to make sure teachers are given training and skills to navigate complex social environments and behaviours in a way that is good for both the teacher and the child.
  • In Wentworth Point, the ambition to cram 2000+ kids into a single oval is bound to fail. We need to make sure young people and communities have access to enough green spaces.

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • There is a huge scarcity of local schools. Locals high school Principals and teachers need to be given enough authority to take disciplinary action against few disruptive students who destroy the teaching and learning environment of the a classroom. There should be performance based promotion and pay in schools. Good and successful schools and teachers need to be rewarded and there should be opportunity created for others to learn from successful teachers and principals.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • We have fantastic schools and teachers in our community, with new and upgraded schools being delivered. We wouldn’t be in this position to deliver this without the Liberal Government’s long-term economic plan.
  • The plan for education focuses on getting back to basics, and doing more of what works, strengthening the foundations of learning with more world-class schools and the best trained teachers. One simple way that will increase the number of teachers is through our proposed one year masters qualification. This will incentivise many more graduates and mid-career professionals to train as teachers and support our growing education system.
  • For parents, we know they want to be more engaged in their child’s education. The plan will also ensure that we are making that easier by sending parents a copy of the curriculum at the start of each year – for parents of high school kids, this will include a list of texts for key learning areas.

Donna Davis (Labor)

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

8Western Sydney keeps getting hotter! It can be costly for families (and others) to keep cool and our changing climate impacts on health and wellbeing. What do you think is needed and what do you commit to doing?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  • Mining and burning coal and gas is the leading cause of the climate crisis. Coal and gas are causing more extreme floods, fires and droughts in NSW. The growing climate crisis threatens our safety and health, our food and water and even the air we breathe. As the world’s 4th largest coal exporter, NSW has a key role to play in tackling the climate crisis. Yet the Liberal, National and Labor parties all take big donations from coal and gas corporations and back new coal and gas.. The Liberal-National Government has even approved 26 coal and gas projects since the Paris Agreement.
  • We don’t need to choose between taking urgent climate action and supporting coal communities. We can do both. Liberal and Labor are lying to workers and communities, saying coal can keep going for decades when science says it clearly can’t.
  • Our promise for a massive investment in the creation of liveable, sustainable and climate-safe homes is based on the conviction that everyone is entitled to live in a comfortable home that they can afford and that everyone should be able to choose to live in an affordable home for the whole of their lives if they choose.

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • One Nation wants to keep the energy prices low. NSW used to have one the cheapest electricity in the world and today under the GREEN Fever we have made it one of the most expensive in the world. The elderly and businesses are really feeling the pain. We plan to move towards renewable with a good mix of solar, nuclear, gas and coal over time. Sustainable plan towards renewable is our main focus.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • I believe in ensuring our green spaces. They are our oases in a busy cityscape providing great lifestyle opportunities in the midst of sensible and sustainable development.
  • That’s why the Perrottet Liberal government committed to upgrading Parramatta Park, Newington Reserve and other green spaces all across Parramatta.
  • We are the river city, so it makes sense to ensure that our residents have access to water activities to promote exercise and help families cool down in a fun and affordable way. Further, the Liberal Government will be opening a new aquatic centre, the future safe beach, and the swimming area at ‘Little Coogee’ inside of Parramatta Park.

Donna Davis (Labor)

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

[yet to provide answer]


9What are your thoughts on the current planning system, in particular complying development? And what, if any, improvements do you want to see?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  • Our planning system is failing communities and the environment. The Liberal-National Government has done the bidding of its developer mates and stripped planning powers from local councils and communities of their rights to object to massively inappropriate and unsustainable development proposals.
  • Our planning system is geared towards maximising the profits of a handful of developers and mining companies at the expense of healthy and vibrant communities. The Greens will put power back into the hands of people, so they can be genuinely involved in major projects or development proposals that impact them or their communities.
  • We will return planning powers to local councils, abolish the failed Local and Regional Planning Panels and ensure that all land-use rezoning decisions are made by councils and communities.
  • The Greens will stop the destruction of mature trees and the sale of public green spaces for development. We will financially support local councils to plant more trees, require developers to include bigger back yards and retain significant trees on private building sites, and regenerate green corridor connections between parks and bushland. We’ll create new green spaces that build connections between people and support wildlife, including community gardens and family-friendly parks.

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • Councils have become the biggest hurdle for affordable housing. We plan to demolish the Green Tape and reduce average house pricess by more than $110000 only by this method. Councils have to respond to development applications in a timely manner and in the absence of council approval coming a timely manner there should be alternative options for people to get their development application processed.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • Planning decisions should be putting community at the forefront. Development must be in service to society – not the other way around!
  • I think the approach to development taken by Parramatta Council has left much to be desired, and I think most of the community would agree with that. There needs to be a refocusing on serving the interests and needs of the community, and this is something I will advocate for and work with Council to do.

Donna Davis (Labor) – See Live Q&A on Facebook

  • At this critical moment for Parramatta, I have the local experience to help our community take advantage of the opportunities before us and deliver the essential infrastructure and services our growing community deserves.

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

10What are 3 key things you plan to achieve if elected?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  1. Introducing safe nurse-to-patient ratios and abolishing the public sector wage cap + giving a real pay rise to our public sector workers with annual pay rises above inflation
  2. End logging our public native forests immediately, protect these vital habitats for threatened wildlife and maintain native forests so that the carbon they store protects us from climate change.
  3. End unfair no-grounds evictions, introduce better minimum standards in rental accommodation including making it mould and damp-free, with ceiling insulation, heating, roof venting and waterproofing with compulsory energy efficiency standards, and internet access and strengthen the rights of tenants to enable long term leases (+ let renters have pets!)

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  1. Better learning and teaching environment in classrooms where the focus will be on literacy, numeracy, STEM and research skills — not pushing Green and anti-family and anti-national political agenda. Respect for parental rights when dealing with children.
  2. Energy security and affordabel energy for all, especially elders and businesses.
  3. Timely punishment to the perpetrators of the crime, keeping in mind the impact of the crime on the victim.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • Deliver the Kids Future Fund so children can put the funds toward their education or housing.
  • Ensuring the delivery of public transport infrastructure such as Stage 2 of the Light Rail and active transport infrastructure.
  • Fixing pinch points in the road networks, such as Wentworth Point, Parramatta CBD and Westmead.

Donna Davis (Labor) – See Live Q&A on Facebook

  • Help to take the pressure off by introducing a $60 a week toll cap, and establishing a publicly owned clean energy company to put downward pressure on power prices.
  • Better services for our growing community – by introducing Safe Staffing Levels in our hospitals, building new schools, and finally starting work on Parramatta Light Rail Stage 2 and investing in community facilities.
  • Help small businesses get ahead – by making outdoor dining permanently available, streamlining payroll tax, and supporting small businesses to sell their goods and services nationally and overseas.

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

11Is there anything else you’d like to share with residents in your electorate?

Ben Hammond (Greens)

  • I first became politically active when I was 16 because I was concerned about the murder of whales in the South Seas. From there, I have gone on to protest and put my body on the line against mining in old-growth forests and to preserve the rights of refugees facing unjust and illegal deportations by the federal government. I campaigned strongly to protect Eastern Creek from Coal Seam Gas exploration. I am telling you this because I want you to know that I have fought, and will always fight, for the side of the people, and the planet against injustice and tyranny. I will not tolerate a spineless government that lets the big end of town do whatever they want, consequences be damned. I will fight to end corporate donations that are destroying our democracy and are making our city unrecognisable, and I will fight to make Parramatta the best place to live with opportunities, green spaces and appropriate sustainable development in intrinsic cohesion through a fair, community-driven planning procedure that will have great outcomes for all of us. Vote [1] Green in Parramatta, and the upper house to give Perrottet and the Liberals the boot!

Mritunjay Singh (One Nation)

  • There is a need for professionals to be coming into politics. There needs to be greaters respect for hardworking people and the tax payers. Taxpayers money need to spent respectfully for nation building and not for buying votes of few sections of society.
    Nations are built in family and school classrooms. There needs to be greater respect for family and traditional values and successful teachers, principals and schools need to be recognised and their models replicated. Zero tolerance to crime on streets and bullying and bad behaviour in classrooms.

Katie Mullens (Liberals)

  • I am committed to being a strong advocate for the community. I will fight every day to ensure your needs are met.
  • A vote for me, Katie Mullens, is a vote for the people of Parramatta.

Donna Davis (Labor) – See Live Q&A on Facebook

  • As a local Councillor, Lord Mayor of Parramatta, and now as your Labor Candidate, my priority is listening to our community.
  • Everywhere I go, I hear that after 12 years in office, Dominic Perrottet and the Liberals’ best days are behind them.
  • I’ve lived locally for almost thirty years, raising my two children here with my husband Michael.
  • I will use my experience to deliver the essential services we rely on – like building new schools for our growing community, improving staffing in our hospitals, and investing in infrastructure and recreational space.
  • With your support, I’ll keep listening and bring a fresh approach to Parramatta.

David Moll (Sustainable Australia Party)

  • [yet to provide answer]

NSW State Election 2023 – General Info

What Are We Voting For?

The 58th Parliament of New South Wales, including all 93 seats in the NSW Legislative Assembly. Plus 21 of the 42 seats in the NSW Legislative Council.

What is the Role of the NSW Parliament?

With three levels of government in Australia, it can be confusing to know who looks after what. The State Parliament makes laws on matters such as:

  • police
  • schools and hospitals
  • state transport, roads and railways
  • housing services
  • community services

When Do I Need to Vote?

NSW Election Day is Saturday 25th March and voting is between 8am and 6pm. Some voting centres or polling places keep different hours so be sure to check. And don’t leave it to the last minute! You’ll need up to an hour to vote in busy times.

You can also vote before Election Day – it’s called pre-polling (when in person) – and early voting starts from 18th March 2023.

Who Needs to Vote?

Voting is compulsory for all Australian citizens who live in NSW and are 18 years of age or older. Fines apply for not voting. You can check your enrolment to vote if unsure.

What Do I Need to Vote?

Take your licence or other photo identification, or something with your current residential address on it. You may also want to take some money to buy a famous election sausage sizzle and support your local school, church or community group. And bring a bottle of water in case you have to wait a long time. Comfy shoes are a good idea as well!

Where Can I Vote?

Voting in person on Election Day (25th March) is still the way a lot of people vote in NSW. It’s generally quick and easy to vote in person at a voting centre or polling place, often at a local school. And election staff and officials are available if you need help. Plus you can usually enjoy a sausage sizzle or cake stall while you wait to vote.

If you would like vote in person, but you are unable to get to a voting centre or polling place on Election Day, you may be eligible to vote early or pre-poll. Early voting for the NSW State election opens from Monday 18th March until Friday 24th March.

The local early voting centres can be found at the following locations and are open Mon-Wed 8:30am to 5:30pm; Thur 8:30am to 8pm; Fri 8:30am to 6pm; Sat 9am to 6pm; closed Sundays.

  • Parramatta: Phive Makers Space, 5 Parramatta Square, level 3. I
  • Ermington: Ermington Community Centre, 6 River Road. It’s open Mon-Wed 8:30am to 5:30pm; Thur 8:30am to 8pm; Fri 8:30am to 6pm; Sat 9am to 6pm; closed Sundays.
  • Wentworth Point: Pulse Centre, 9 The Crescent

You can also vote by post/ mail – applications close 20th March.

How is My Vote Counted?

There are two papers you will be required to fill out on Election Day to vote:

  1. Small paper is Legislative Assembly (lower house of NSW parliament)
  2. Large paper is Legislative Council (upper house of NSW parliament)

You will be given choices on each paper of which individuals or parties you would like to give your vote to. You may choose on each paper to simply put a 1 next to the candidate of your choice. But you may number more if you wish. It’s different for each paper.

  • For Legislative Assembly ballot paper (small): A candidate has to receive 50% of all votes+1 to be elected. This is called an ‘absolute majority’. If the candidate you have voted 1 for, does not have enough votes to be elected, votes are re-sorted to the other candidates remaining, according to the second preference. This is why some people choose to vote by numbering their 2nd, 3rd and 4th etc preferences. See here for more information on voting in the Legislative Assembly (small paper).
  • For Legislative Council ballot paper (large): You may vote above OR below the line, but not both. You may “Vote 1” for the party you prefer ABOVE the line (listed as “Groups”). This is the minimum you need to do to vote. But you may further empower your vote for other preferred parties by labelling 2, 3, 4 etc above the line, and preferences apply, as for the lower house. If you choose to vote BELOW the line you must number a minimum of 15 boxes. See here for more information about voting for the Legislative Council.

Some “how to vote” cards suggest preferences but you are free to vote for any candidate or party you wish. And give your preferences (2nd 3rd 4th choices) to anyone you wish.

What Do I Do After Voting?

Enjoy a (democracy) sausage sizzle, return your how to vote papers to the party for reuse and politely decline any more. A simple “I’ve voted”, or “no thank you” should keep unwanted party politics away.

If interested tune in to TV coverage after 6pm and have your own political watch party!! Results and trends often become clear on the night of election day.

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